Pink dinosaur romper

There’s so many romper patterns around and I’ve managed to accumulate a few over the years but there’s always something about each one I’m not particularly keen on so I decided to create my perfect pattern on what I like to sew and as a mum, what I think is best.

Brindille and Twig do a lovely rolled hem romper but after removing a romper from the dryer, the rolled hems go a bit weird and twisted. Also you have to more or less undress the baby to change a nappy. In the Kwiksew pattern 2433, the body is so baggy and the legs too short (for my children anyway).

I decided to use both these patterns to create what I wanted. I wanted short sleeves so its good for summer but still have long legs to protect Edith from the sun when she’s in the sling or if the weather is slightly cooler in the evening, she can wear a cardi over it.

How did I cut my pattern?

I’ve used the Kwiksew neckline, I like the half way down the body opening. Its easier to pull over Edith’s head when she’s crawling away rather than a fully opening body where I have to lie Edith on top of it (I’m usually chasing her while dressing her!). I’ve then used the Brindille and Twig body shaping because the shoulders are in the correct place and I like how the legs fit. To combine these patterns I’ve matched the centre fronts as they’re both on the straight grain. I’ve also used Brindille and Twig’s short sleeves but removed the rolled hem and just cut a regular 1.5cm hem allowance as I intend to use my twin needle instead.

I want a leg opening so taking inspiration from other clothes in the drawer, I’ve cut two bindings 3cm wide to use on the inside legs. I’ve then cut some ankle cuffs which are a couple centimetres less than the ankle circumference. Rather than just letting the legs popper all the way down, which can be tricky when you have a wriggly baby, I wanted fixed cuffs which I can slip her feet through quickly and then popper the rest as I chase her.

Making it

Like most jersey baby clothes I make, the seams are overlocked to stitch seams together unless otherwise stated. To start the romper, I’ve used interfacing on the front opening and pressed it back. The edges are overlocked to make them neat and sit flat, not because they will fray. The base of the opening is then bagged out to create nice tidy square edges which are then stitched down.

The shoulders are then joined and the sleeve heads are attached.

Next, the neck binding is attached. I’ve used Brindille and Twig’s neck binding because I like the crisp look of theirs over the kwiksew binding. This is just a strip folded in half. I’ve pressed the seam allowance down and used a twin needle to make it lie flat and allow stretching.

Now the side seams and sleeves can be sewn together in one go, starting from base of legs to hems of sleeves.

The sleeve edges are then pressed under 1.5cm and I’ved used a twin needle to create a cover stitch effect. Twin needles are great for jersey hems because they allow the edges to stretch and ping back to original shape.

Winging it with the leg opening

The leg bindings are created from folding two strips in half the same length as the open leg measurement and attaching with overlocker. The front one is pressed under and the back one just has the seam allowance pressed back.

With the two bindings laying on top of each other, I’ve pinned together the hems in readiness for the cuffs.

The cuffs are folded in half and stitched down. Then with stitched edge inside folded over. Its very hard to explain but hopefully photo below clears it up and you have a neat circle to attach.

Now I just need to hammer in my poppers (see baby vest post for more info) on inside leg and down centre front.

And voila…!!

Ready for Edith to wear later in year.

Thanks for reading

Rosie xx

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